Category: Opinion

Recruiter SoapBox: Is it worth going to university to get a job?

News in this week – the U.K. job market for new university graduates has shrunk this year, even though the economy has improved. Outspoken recruitment specialist Mitch Sullivan wonders is it worth going to university to get a job?. Recession-induced nervousness, and massive hikes in tuition fees have spooked many people.
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5 steps to becoming a great recruiter

It’s a no-brainer. Recruiters who can combine a rare understanding of people with a fierce grasp of commerce are going to have happy clients, well-placed candidates and brisker business. But, worry not. If those qualities don’t come naturally, you can still emulate a skilful recruiter to stay at the top of your game. Here are five steps to help you.
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Giving negative feedback to candidates

For recruiters an interview is routine; for a candidate it’s a high-stress and potentially life changing event. Interviewer feedback is therefore very important. Sometimes it’s excellent, but many candidates say that it is frequently either non-existent or unhelpful. Unhelpful feedback falls into several categories:   1. Bland Often a variant on “we met other people who fit the job better”. This may be untrue,.
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How will Star Wars being filmed in the UK impact the jobs market?

News that the filming of the next Star Wars movie, the seventh in the franchise, will take place in Britain next year has been greeted with glee by Chancellor George Osborne. Speaking on Sky News Osborne called the announcement a “real vote of confidence in Britain’s creative industries”, and one which he claims will secure thousands of jobs – if.
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Is the banking industry screwed?

The recent news that RBS is set to add to the troubled banking industry and slash a further 1,400 posts across the UK, came almost at the same time that the beleagured bank announced that £215million of its £607million bonus pool would go to investment bankers in its so-called “casino banking” division, which is widely seen as having helped in.
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Jose Mourinho: Rehiring someone you sacked

Rehiring an employee that you made redundant is a rare occurrence for many employers, as it usually means admitting mistakes and realising that their sacking was not completely justified. Many employers believe that starting afresh with a new employee is the only way to go, but what happens when you realise that the employee you fired was in fact the.
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Does Twitter actually help your recruitment process?

How many recruiters and candidates out there use Twitter as a job hunting tool? The answer is surprisingly few. Many Twittter users see it primarily as a tool to market themselves, rather than a way to link with a vast pool of untapped candidates. Part of this is down to the profile that Twitter has within the media and the perception.
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The worst job ads ever

It’s tough, writing job ads these days. On the one hand you have to attract your ideal candidate. On the other you must offend no-one, and expect a barrage of mockery and abuse from bloggers if you make any mistakes or try a little bit too hard to be entertaining. Even worse, if you allow the slightest whiff of discrimination.
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Good and bad ways of sourcing candidates

This is an interesting one. I believe, as I’ve said in previous blogs, that good recruitment is all about relationships and not sales targets. Bear this in mind when sourcing candidates, as you’ll have a better chance of filling your client vacancies if you can talk passionately and confidently to your clients about the candidates you are putting in front.
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In-house recruitment Vs agency recruitment

I’ve previously worked with some leading brands where I was in charge of running in-house teams, but since moving to the dark side there is one question I get asked at every networking event I go to: “Why won’t the in-house recruitment team answer the phone when I know I have candidates to fill their vacancies, especially as in-house recruitment.
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